Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Where Dixie Came From

There are conflicting stories about how the South came to be known as Dixie. Some say that it was thus named after The Mason and Dixon survey of the Maryland-Pennsylvania boundary. Why wasn't it called Masie, instead? Well podners, that ain't right. Here's the real deal:

In the early days of the 19th century, when the flatboat and keelboat men from the Midwest states and Kentucky tiresomely poled their ways down the Mississippi, they were looking forward to the end of the trip and getting paid. )Think of Mike Fink, the King of the River.) Now typically these keelboat men were paid is locally-issued banknotes with the French word "dix" on  for "ten" on them. Now the keelboat men, not pronouncing the French word dix properly with a silent "x", referred to New Orleans as the land of the Dixies.  Gradually, the scope of Dixie spread until it included the entire South. It could have been worse: if the keelboatmen pronounced dix right, we might have wound up with 'Dee-hee."

And that's why there is Dixie Beer! Drink a bottle in honor of the tired, French-challenged keelboat men!



8 comments:

Gorilla Bananas said...

So New Orleans was the original Dixieland? Well blow me down! I never even thought of New Orleans as properly a part of the South! It always seemed like a corpus separatum to me.

Mike said...

Better not tell any die hard rednecks that their land was named after something French.

Big Sky Heidi said...

A great story! An okay beer.

bakku-shan said...

So much for what some were taught in school

Cloudia said...

LOVE it, Angel! Thanks

Chuck Bear said...

I don't mind if I do!

John Hill said...

Dixie long necks and Popeye's Chicken were staples back in my days at Tulane.

eViL pOp TaRt said...

Great choices, John!

Gorilla, New Orleans is Southern' but not Scarlett O'Hara Southern.

Thanks for your support, Cloudia.

Best to all of you!